FOUNDATIONS of DEMOCRACY

Article by Michael Prokopow
Vice-Regal Mansions in Canada

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HORTLY AFTER JUSTIN TRUDEAU was elected Prime Ministerdesignate in October, 2015, a story surfaced in the press about whether or not the son of former Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau would move with his family into 24 Sussex Drive, the official residence since the 1940s and the house in which he

SHARDS of IDENTITY

Article by Lorraine Flanigan
Piecing Together Domestic Fragments

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HE YEAR WAS 1697, and Pierre le Moyne d’Iberville led his French soldiers to Carbonear, one of the oldest settlements in Newfoundland, to set siege on the craggy, treeless, and dangerously inaccessible Carbonear Island where 200 English settlers had taken refuge behind protective earthworks.

“The civilian defenders of this island watched

Chalk LINES

Article by Lorraine Johnson
The Social and Architectural Restoration of Galt’s Old Post Office

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LASSROOM NOTES written on a school chalkboard are intended, by nature and by material, for erasure. Thus, imagine architect John Leroux’s surprise when, during a renovation of an 1884 building in Fredericton, New Brunswick, a chalkboard complete with century-old, perfectly preserved writing was discovered intact

Shelf LIFE

Article by Jules Torti
The Social and Architectural Restoration of Galt’s Old Post Office

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OFFEE HOUSES AND LIBRARIES have long been gathering grounds for community movers and shakers. Acting as social hubs, a hotbed for literary giants and innovation, it makes sense that they should merge. The juxtapositions between coffee houses and libraries are blurring, especially in Cambridge, Ontario,

GEORGE STEPHEN

Article by Alexander Reford
A Client and His Commissions

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HEN WE THINK ABOUT ARCHITECTURE, we most often think about the building and the architect who designed it. Less often do we consider the client or the person behind the commission.

George Stephen (1829-1921) left an architectural legacy that includes four buildings that are national historic sites and properties designated

Maritime MEDIEVAL

Article by John Leroux
Building Fragments on the Bluffs

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ETWEEN 1841 AND 1859, Herbert Minton of Stoke-Upon-Trent, England, presented vast amounts of beautiful inlaid ceramic floor and wall tiles to more than one hundred churches throughout England, establishing one of the most glorious and permanent architectural expressions of an individual’s faith and generosity. He was a devout Anglican and

A FOLLY in TIME

Article by Tatum Taylor
Building Fragments on the Bluffs

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T THE EDGE OF THE SCARBOROUGH BLUFFS, where Toronto meets Lake Ontario, remnants of the city’s past rest in peace. The grounds of Guild Park, a former estate and artists’ community, are scattered with fragments of local buildings that were demolished between the 1950s and 1970s. On the lawns, Corinthian