FITTING CLOTHES for Louis Riel

Article by Frann Harris

W
HEN THE OPENING NIGHT OF LOUIS RIEL loomed on Gillian Gallow’s calendar, she considered how the wardrobe team could complete the costumes in time. The costume designer for the Canadian Opera Company’s new production realized that, in particular, embroidering the costumes would be extremely time-consuming. She also wanted the embroidery to look authentic, to create

The Red Clay of PEI and the Career of MARY ALLISON DOULL

Article by Leanne Gaudet

A
CURIOUS TURQUOISE, white, and navy coloured earthenware vase currently resides in the collection of the Eptek Art and Culture Centre in Summerside, Prince Edward Island (PEI). Upon first inspection, the vase might leave viewers feeling unimpressed: the navy glaze is smudged, causing the design to appear blurry and unrefined, while the underlying turquoise glaze drips

TABLE TALK

Article by Leopold Kowolik
A Cabinet as Sculpture and Object

I
N THE THIRD QUARTER of the twentieth century, the historic question of object and sculpture was reaching an apex. The situation at that time was best summarized by Michael Fried in his famous 1967 essay “Art and Objecthood” in which he encapsulated the concerns of the minimalists: “They are

L’ ÉCOLE NATIONALE du MEUBLE et de L’ÉBÉNISTERIE de VICTORIAVILLE

Article by Jean-Pierre Plessix
The Social and Architectural Restoration of Galt’s Old Post Office

1963–1965
Le projet d’une école spécialisée en fabrication de meubles en série prend forme au cours de plusieurs rencontres d’industriels de la région à partir du 25 Mai 1963.

Après avoir déposé un rapport décrivant les besoins d’une telle formation auprès du ministère de l’éducation et

WEST COAST IDENTITY

Article by Sarah Carter
A Contemporary Cabinet of Curiosities

C
ABINETS OF CURIOSITIES, odd collections of natural specimens and cultural artifacts, have long appealed to scholars interested in the history of collecting and the origins of the modern museum. These peculiar assemblages, however, have also made appearances in publications investigating the history of science, specifically those that have turned their

“ESKIMO IDENTIFICATION TAGS”

Article by John Fleming
in Arctic Canada

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RECENT EXHIBITION at Feheley Fine Arts in Toronto featuring works by Inuit artist and photographer Barry Pottle sheds light on a government of Canada policy during the period 1944 to 1969, when the federal government issued numbered tags of identification to the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic in two broad regions east

CURIOUSER and CURIOUSER

Article by Esther E. Shipman

F
EW THINGS INTRIGUE, DELIGHT, AND MYSTIFY like a treasure box that requires some effort and ingenuity to unlock its secrets. Imagine ninety-six compartments in one larger-thanlife treasure box—one that was commissioned as a public art piece, made an auspicious splash, becoming an instant Canadian art icon immediately after it was unveiled, and a madly

FOUNDATIONS of DEMOCRACY

Article by Michael Prokopow
Vice-Regal Mansions in Canada

S
HORTLY AFTER JUSTIN TRUDEAU was elected Prime Ministerdesignate in October, 2015, a story surfaced in the press about whether or not the son of former Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau would move with his family into 24 Sussex Drive, the official residence since the 1940s and the house in which he

SHARDS of IDENTITY

Article by Lorraine Flanigan
Piecing Together Domestic Fragments

T
HE YEAR WAS 1697, and Pierre le Moyne d’Iberville led his French soldiers to Carbonear, one of the oldest settlements in Newfoundland, to set siege on the craggy, treeless, and dangerously inaccessible Carbonear Island where 200 English settlers had taken refuge behind protective earthworks.

“The civilian defenders of this island watched