La Terrine du SEIGNEUR DE ROUVILLE

Article by René Villeneuve

C
Le 7 décembre 2015, la communauté des arts décoratifs canadiens était fébrile car ce soir-là, une pièce capitale était offerte aux enchères chez Waddington’s, à Toronto. Le lot 248 décrivait A Canadian Treasure : Laurent Amiot’s Soup Tureen with the Arms of the Hertel de Rouville Family (Fig. 1), illustré en couverture du catalogue de

The Clarion Call of the CALLIOPE

Article by Noelle Grosse and Ruth Bitner

T
HERE’S NOTHING LIKE THE SOUND of a calliope to lend a festive air to a parade. For the parade-goers of Saskatchewan, the whistles of the calliope owned by the Western Development Museum have been a familiar sound for decades. Indeed, Calliope in Greek mythology was the Muse of epic poetry and literally

WEST COAST IDENTITY

Article by Sarah Carter
A Contemporary Cabinet of Curiosities

C
ABINETS OF CURIOSITIES, odd collections of natural specimens and cultural artifacts, have long appealed to scholars interested in the history of collecting and the origins of the modern museum. These peculiar assemblages, however, have also made appearances in publications investigating the history of science, specifically those that have turned their

L’ ÉCOLE NATIONALE du MEUBLE et de L’ÉBÉNISTERIE de VICTORIAVILLE

Article by Jean-Pierre Plessix
The Social and Architectural Restoration of Galt’s Old Post Office

1963–1965
Le projet d’une école spécialisée en fabrication de meubles en série prend forme au cours de plusieurs rencontres d’industriels de la région à partir du 25 Mai 1963.

Après avoir déposé un rapport décrivant les besoins d’une telle formation auprès du ministère de l’éducation et

TABLE TALK

Article by Leopold Kowolik
A Cabinet as Sculpture and Object

I
N THE THIRD QUARTER of the twentieth century, the historic question of object and sculpture was reaching an apex. The situation at that time was best summarized by Michael Fried in his famous 1967 essay “Art and Objecthood” in which he encapsulated the concerns of the minimalists: “They are

CURIOUSER and CURIOUSER

Article by Esther E. Shipman

F
EW THINGS INTRIGUE, DELIGHT, AND MYSTIFY like a treasure box that requires some effort and ingenuity to unlock its secrets. Imagine ninety-six compartments in one larger-thanlife treasure box—one that was commissioned as a public art piece, made an auspicious splash, becoming an instant Canadian art icon immediately after it was unveiled, and a madly

“ESKIMO IDENTIFICATION TAGS”

Article by John Fleming
in Arctic Canada

A
RECENT EXHIBITION at Feheley Fine Arts in Toronto featuring works by Inuit artist and photographer Barry Pottle sheds light on a government of Canada policy during the period 1944 to 1969, when the federal government issued numbered tags of identification to the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic in two broad regions east

A FOLLY in TIME

Article by Tatum Taylor
Building Fragments on the Bluffs

A
T THE EDGE OF THE SCARBOROUGH BLUFFS, where Toronto meets Lake Ontario, remnants of the city’s past rest in peace. The grounds of Guild Park, a former estate and artists’ community, are scattered with fragments of local buildings that were demolished between the 1950s and 1970s. On the lawns, Corinthian

Maritime MEDIEVAL

Article by John Leroux
Building Fragments on the Bluffs

B
ETWEEN 1841 AND 1859, Herbert Minton of Stoke-Upon-Trent, England, presented vast amounts of beautiful inlaid ceramic floor and wall tiles to more than one hundred churches throughout England, establishing one of the most glorious and permanent architectural expressions of an individual’s faith and generosity. He was a devout Anglican and